2023 Engineering Undergraduate Recipients

Molly Brown

Molly Brown

Molly Brown is a sophomore at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY ESF) majoring in environmental resources engineering and earning a minor in mathematics. Throughout the semester, she works as a tutor at SUNY ESF’s Math Learning Center, where she assists students with whatever math-related questions they may have. After this semester, she will be assisting one of her professors with research on carbon cycling and sequestration ecosystem services in natural and managed surface water systems. By the nature of studying engineering at an environmental school, it becomes apparent how prevalent NDT methods are in terms of creating sustainable solutions. Molly was also able to see sustainable solutions firsthand through her internship at Vector Magnetics LLC, where she assisted with tasks such as parts assemblies, projects in the machine shop, and electronics testing to assist the company as they worked toward various goals.

 
Laurel Logan

Laurel Logan

Laurel Logan has always been fascinated by the physical sciences and understanding how the world around her works. Choosing a major in college was a challenge because she wanted to learn and understand everything, but she ultimately decided on mechanical engineering due to its broadness and focus on underlying mechanics. During Logan’s time in college, she had the opportunity to work on several research projects, including acousto-optic nondestructive inspection, which sparked her interest in optics and nondestructive testing. She also worked at Virginia Tech in a mechanical engineering lab with a focus on cell mechanics and biomedical engineering, which exposed her to a different side of mechanical engineering research. Logan found herself fascinated by the technology they used to conduct their studies and began to think more about researching and developing engineering sensors and testing technology. This summer, Logan is excited to be interning at Boeing’s Advanced Development Center to work on developing and improving nondestructive evaluation technology. Logan is eager to explore a wide range of sciences and gain exposure to different testing, sensor, and ultrasonic technology. Her goal is to continue this work in research and development after completing her graduate education in mechanical engineering.

 
Michael Wilson

Michael Wilson

Michael Wilson was born and raised in Arizona, where his family established an inspection and nondestructive testing (NDT) business. Growing up, Wilson experienced many aspects of the business firsthand and learned the importance of uncompromising standards in inspection and testing, integrity, and safety. Today, Wilson is a motivated engineering student currently double majoring in mechanical engineering and engineering design at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (RHIT). Wilson recently put together a team to develop an invention of his, which was awarded the Bill Kline Innovation award at RHIT, and he is a current Dean’s list student. The knowledge and work ethic Wilson has gained through his experience with NDT and the industry gave him a solid foundation that will serve him well in his future career as an engineer.